The Show Notes: Rabbit Hole of Research Episode 10: Time Travel is Weird

Nick and I talk about the Event Horizon, Groundhog Day, Evil Dead, Somewhere in Time, Final Destination, Handwavium, Encyclopedia Britannica, Handwashing, Video Game logic and more spacetime stuff.

Print By Georgia Geis @ atomic_number14

Episode 10: Time Travel is Weird

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy. 

Don’t forget to Rate the show!

artwork by 

Georgia Geis@atomicnumber14 https://www.instagram.com/atomic_number14/

Say hello and let us know:

If you traveled through time what Three Books would you take?

Favorite Time Travel Machine?

Is driving a car considered time travel?


What we drinking?

Nick and Joe shared a celebratory Leche Borracho: Bottle Logic Brewing


Images from the Fan Event held at Bean Me Up Roastery. And if you missed it, don’t worry we will do one again for our 1 year podcast anniversary!


Joe’s Show Notes:

Time travelrefers to the hypothetical concept of moving between different points in time, either forwards or backwards.

What is a black hole? a region of spacetime where gravity is so strong that nothing, including light and other electromagnetic waves, is capable of possessing enough energy to escape it.

What is a wormhole? a hypothetical structure connecting disparate points in spacetime, and is based on a special solution of the Einstein field equations

In Einstein’s theory of general relativity, making a wormhole is pretty straightforward: You just build a black hole and connect it to a hypothetical white hole (which is the exact opposite of a black hole), and boom, there you have it: a tunnel through space-time.

What is a white hole? a hypothetical region of spacetime and singularity that cannot be entered from the outside, although energy-matter, light and information can escape from it.

What is spacetime? a mathematical model that fuses the three dimensions of space and the one dimension of time into a single four-dimensional continuum

The Year Ash ended up in Evil Dead 3 is 1300 AD: Army Of Darkness

Evil Dead Timeline.

Time Bandits (1981)

We realized after recording it wasn’t Miracle on 34th street but It’s a Wonderful Life (the Christmas movie I was thinking about.)

HG Wells Time Machine movies; 1960 and 2002

Is Final Destination a Time Travel Movie?

The Encyclopedia Britannica 15th edition with 32 volumes was last printed in 2010.

The Cotton Club

Kitty Pride Time travel by phasing.

The Flash time travel and the Multiverse.

Let The Ants Try. 1949 by Frederik Pohl (as James MacCreigh)

Young Marvels by Skottie Young, Dan Slott, Ruben Diaz

Earth has a rotational kinetic energy of 2.14×10^29 J. So You’d need a minimum of twice that much energy to stop and then start Earth rotating in the opposite direction.

Somewhere in Time (1980)

Superman: The Movie (1978)

Christopher Reeve

History of time travel Movie (2014)

See You Yesterday (2019)Produced by Spike Lee

Horology: the study of time and the art of measuring it. It involves the design, construction, and maintenance of clocks, watches, and other timepieces.

Chronometrythe science of accurate time measurement


MYTHICAL REFERENCES TO TIME TRAVEL

  1. Hindu mythology, the Vishnu Purana mentions the story of King Raivata Kakudmi, who travels to heaven to meet the creator Brahma and is surprised to learn when he returns to Earth that many ages have passed.
  2. The Buddhist Pāli Canon mentions the relativity of time. The Payasi Sutta tells of one of the Buddha’s chief disciples, Kumara Kassapa, who explains to the skeptic Payasi that time in the Heavens passes differently than on Earth.
  3. The Japanese tale of “Urashima Tarō“, first described in the Manyoshu tells of a young fisherman named Urashima-no who visits an undersea palace. After three days, he returns home to his village and finds himself 300 years in the future, where he has been forgotten, his house is in ruins, and his family has died.
  4. In Jewish tradition, the 1st-century BC scholar Honi ha-M’agel is said to have fallen asleep and slept for seventy years. When waking up he returned home but found none of the people he knew, and no one believed his claims of who he was.

Early examples of Prolonged Sleep Time Travel

  1. The Year 2440: A Dream If Ever There Was One, (1770) by Louis-Sébastien Mercier.
  2. Rip Van Winkle (1819) by Washington Irving
  3. Looking Backward (1888) by Edward Bellamy
  4. When the Sleeper Awakes (1899) by H. G. Wells

Early examples of Backward Time Travel

  1. Chinese novel Supplement to the Journey to the West (c. 1640) by Dong Yue features magical mirrors and jade gateways that connect various points in time
  2. Samuel Madden’s Memoirs of the Twentieth Century (1733) is a series of letters from British ambassadors in 1997 and 1998 to diplomats in the past, conveying the political and religious conditions of the future.
  3. Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol (1843) has early depictions of mystical time travel in both directions.

Early examples of Machine Based Time Travel

  1. The Clock that Went Backward by Edward Page Mitchell,which appeared in the New York Sun in (1881).
  2. Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau’s El Anacronópete (1887) may have been the first story to feature a vessel engineered to travel through time.
  3. H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895) popularized the concept of time travel by mechanical means.

Time Travel Paradoxes

1. Grandfather Paradox: As mentioned earlier, the grandfather paradox involves a time traveler going back in time and preventing their own grandfather from meeting their grandmother, thereby preventing their own birth. This creates a logical contradiction because if the time traveler prevents their own birth, they would not exist to travel back in time in the first place.

2. Bootstrap Paradox: In a bootstrap paradox, an object or information is sent back in time, creating a loop where the object’s origin cannot be determined. For example, a person might travel back in time and give their past self a book containing information about the future. The question then arises: where did the book come from if it was never created?

3. Predestination Paradox: Also known as a causal loop, the predestination paradox occurs when a time traveler’s actions in the past inadvertently contribute to the events they were trying to prevent. This paradox suggests that events are predestined to happen in a certain way, regardless of attempts to change them.

4. Ontological Paradox: Similar to the bootstrap paradox, an ontological paradox involves objects or information that exist without having a discernible origin. For example, a person might receive instructions or blueprints from their future self, allowing them to create a new invention. However, the question remains: who originally created the instructions if they were never created by anyone?

5. Twin Paradox: In the context of special relativity, the twin paradox arises when one twin travels through space at relativistic speeds while the other remains on Earth. When the traveling twin returns, they find that less time has passed for them than for their sibling. This paradox challenges our intuitive understanding of time dilation and the effects of relative motion.


The idea of reversing the rotation of the Earth to travel back in time—pure Handwavium

1. Conservation of Energy and Momentum: Reversing the rotation of the Earth would require an enormous amount of energy and would violate the principles of conservation of energy and momentum. Even if it were somehow possible to reverse the rotation of the Earth, it would not cause time to flow backward.

2. Time and Spacetime: In physics, time is considered a dimension of spacetime, and reversing the rotation of the Earth would not alter the direction of time. Time is a fundamental aspect of the universe that flows inexorably forward, regardless of the rotation or movement of celestial bodies.

3. Causality and Paradoxes: Even if it were possible to reverse the rotation of the Earth and somehow manipulate time, it would likely lead to paradoxes and inconsistencies in causality. The implications of reversing time would raise significant philosophical and theoretical questions about the nature of reality.


Print by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. 

The Show Notes: Rabbit Hole of Research Episode 8: Teleportation

Nick, Evan and Joe talk about teleportation, the last perfect 8 minutes on Earth, Event Horizon, Michael Myers, The Matrix, Harry Potter, Jumper, and lots of love for Jeff Goldblum!

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy. 

Don’t forget to Rate the show!

artwork by 

Georgia Geis@atomicnumber14 https://www.instagram.com/atomic_number14/


Say hello and let us know:

Favorite movie, show or book that uses teleportation?

Is Jumper a good movie?

Loading…


What we drinking?

Joe: Zombie Dankness: Beer Zombies

Nick: Braaaaaaaains: Drekker Brewing 

Evan: Journeyman Whiskey


Teleportation definition 

  1. A fictional transfer of matter or energy from one point to another without traversing the physical space between them.
  2. Often paired with time travel.
  3. There is no known physical mechanism that would allow for matter teleportation.
  4. Teleportation cannot be instantaneous because you can not travel faster than light. 

Philadelphia Experiment


Teleportation in Harry Potter Series:

  1. Harry Porter and the Goblet of Fire
  2. Foo Network: fire place teleportation
  3. Portke
  4. Kings Cross Train Station: Platform Nine and Three Quarters

Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)


Packets of information being sent into space revealing Earth’s position to aliens

3 Body Problem


Ship of Theseus


The Fly goofs


Number of atoms in human body


How long does it take to get from Philippines to Mexico?

~6 hours by plane

~24 days by ship


Early examples of teleportation in science fiction 

1. The earliest recorded story of a “matter transmitter” was Edward Page Mitchell‘s “The Man Without a Body” in 1877. Not to be confused with the 1956 B-sci-fi film. 

2. 1897 novel To Venus in Five Seconds by Fred T. Jane. Jane’s protagonist is transported from a strange-machinery-containing gazebo on Earth to planet Venus – hence the title.


Wolverine movie with Will.i.am?

X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009)


NSF QuBBE 

Seeks to create quantum measurements and imaging systems that exceed classical limits to extract novel information from biology.


Classic Physics


Quantum Mechanics


Photoelectric effect—early 1900s—

Albert Einstein won Nobel for his theories about the photoelectronic effect. 


Albert Einstein described his most famous formula in the forth paper he published.


Quantum entanglement

Einstein called it: spooky action at a distance. 

Quantum entanglement was first recognized by Einstein, Podolsky, Roson and Schrodinger.


Quantum teleportation 


Teleportation is Possible, but only in Quantum


Quantum information


Print by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. 

Rabbit Hole of Research: The Show Notes: Episode 7: Lighthouses

Joe, Nick, and Georgia talk about the science of Lighthouses, Statue of Liberty, Day of the Triffids, Annihilation, Shutter Island, Fresnel, and other facts that will make you an expert pharologist.

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy. 

Don’t forget to Rate the show!

artwork by 

Georgia Geis@atomicnumber14 https://www.instagram.com/atomic_number14/


Say hello and let us know:

Favorite movie that features a Lighthouse?

Did you know what a Pharologist was before listening to the episode?


What we drinking?

Joe: Spiritless Old Fashioned

Nick: Full Pocket Pilsner: Goose Island

Georgia: Water

**Spoiler alert: I talk about The Day of the Triffids (1963) in this episode. 

Lighthouse fun facts

1. 800 still exist in US even though modern technologies exist to fulfill their purpose of guiding ships. 

2. Michigan has over 100 lighthouses, more than any state in US

3. [Boston Light]— 1716 US first official lighthouse built on little Brewster island, Boston harbor. Original destroyed during Revolutionary War—rebuilt in 1783–raises to current height in 1859 adding a Fresnel Lens. 

4. I love you lighthouse: [Minot’s Ledge Light], southeast of Boston Harbor has the “I Love You” light characteristic (1,4,3 light pattern). The current lighthouse is the second on the site, the first having been washed away in a storm after only a few months of use.

5. First lighthouse in America to use electricity was a metal tower in the shape of a woman in New York Harbor. It’s called the [Statue of Liberty]. 

6. Lighthouses also had to use sound to guide ships through fog—foghorns, bells, cannons, etc. 

7. Boston Light only lighthouse still staffed in America. 


Lighthouse keepers that disappeared


Pharology : Study of lighthouses


Lighthouse science:

First lighthouse


Famous lighthouses


Famous lighthouse operators and innovators

Movies that feature a lighthouse

  1. “Annihilation” (2018) – Directed by Alex Garland, this film features a mysterious lighthouse at the center of an otherworldly phenomenon.
  2. The Lighthouse” (2019) – Although more of a psychological horror film, “The Lighthouse,” directed by Robert Eggers, incorporates elements of fantasy and surrealism.
  3. Shutter Island” (2010) – Directed by Martin Scorsese, this psychological thriller has elements of science fiction and features a lighthouse prominently in its storyline.
  4. “The Fog” (1980) – Directed by John Carpenter, this horror film revolves around a mysterious fog that rolls into a coastal town, and the town’s lighthouse plays a significant role.
  5. The Day of the Triffids (1963) —a British science fiction horror film directed by Steve Sekely and Freddie Francis, very loosely based on the 1951 novel of the same name by John Wyndham. 
Print by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking.

Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 4: Giant Animals Show Notes



Episode 4: The Show Notes

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy.

What we drinking:

Joe: Phony Negroni —St. Argrestis

Nick: Water


Let us know:

What’s your favorite animal?

What’s your favorite giant animal movie?

Favorite color?


Leave a comment

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Show notes:

Technically any plane carrying the president is designated as Air Force One:

Air Force One (1997) movie

What is Dry January

Food of the Gods 1976 movie 

Food of the Gods Novel by H.G. Wells

Art by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Let the Ants Try by Frederik Pohl (short story)

Where do sloths live?

Sloths are found throughout Central America and northern South America, including parts of Brazil and Peru

Who sings song—“You and me, baby, ain’t nothin’ but mammals So let’s do it like they do on the Discovery Channel”? 

Bloodhound Group—‘The Bad Touch’ 

Aldi and Trader Joe’s history

E. L. Doctorow: Homer and Langley—universal newspaper

Seanan McGuire (Mira Grant) Into the Drowning Deep

Pushing beached whales into ocean?

Whalefall—Daniel Kraus 

Largest land animal

The African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) holds the title for the largest land animal. Adult male African elephants can weigh between 5,000 to 14,000 pounds (2,268 to 6,350 kilograms) and stand about 8.2 to 13 feet (2.5 to 4 meters) tall at the shoulder. Female African elephants are generally smaller than males but still large compared to other land animals.

It’s worth noting that the size of elephants can vary, and these measurements are approximate. The African Elephant’s large size is a testament to its adaptation to diverse habitats across the African continent.

Largest sea animal

The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) holds the title for the largest sea animal and, in fact, the largest animal on Earth. Adult blue whales can reach lengths of up to 100 feet (30 meters) and weigh as much as 200 tons. These enormous marine mammals are filter feeders, primarily consuming small shrimp-like animals called krill.

The sheer size of blue whales is remarkable, and they are found in oceans around the world, making them a truly global species. Despite their massive size, blue whales are gentle creatures, and their conservation status is classified as endangered due to historical whaling practices. Conservation efforts are ongoing to protect and preserve these magnificent marine animals.

The size of animals is constrained by various biological, ecological, and physical factors. Some limitations include:

1. Metabolic Demands: Larger animals generally have higher metabolic demands. Meeting these demands becomes challenging, as it requires sufficient food intake, efficient energy utilization, and effective waste removal.

2. Support Structures: The strength of bones, muscles, and other support structures is crucial. Beyond a certain size, the ability to support the body’s weight becomes a limiting factor.

3. Respiratory System: Diffusion-based respiratory systems become less effective as an organism grows larger. Efficient gas exchange becomes challenging, potentially limiting the maximum size of animals relying on this mechanism.

4. Heat Dissipation: Larger animals face challenges in dissipating heat efficiently. This is due to the decrease in surface area relative to volume, affecting heat exchange with the environment.

5. Reproductive Challenges: Larger animals often have fewer offspring and longer gestation periods. This could impact reproductive strategies and population dynamics.

6. Predator-Prey Dynamics: Size affects the ability to evade predators or capture prey. Both extreme sizes, very large or very small, can be disadvantageous in certain ecological niches.

7. Evolutionary Pressures: Evolutionary pressures may favor smaller sizes in specific environments, promoting agility, rapid reproduction, and adaptability over large size.

8. Ecological Niche: Each species occupies a specific ecological niche, and the size of an organism is often adapted to its role in the ecosystem. Deviating too much from the optimal size for a given niche could be disadvantageous.

Sources:

• Schmidt-Nielsen, K. (1984). Scaling: Why is Animal Size So Important? Cambridge University Press.

The size of insects is constrained by various biological and physical factors. Here are some key limitations:

1. Exoskeleton: Insects have an exoskeleton made of a rigid material called chitin. As they grow, they need to molt and shed their exoskeleton to accommodate a larger size. This process becomes more challenging as the insect gets larger due to the increased structural demands.

2. Respiratory System: Insects rely on a system of tiny tubes called tracheae for respiration. As they grow larger, the surface area available for gas exchange becomes insufficient, limiting their ability to provide oxygen to all cells effectively.

3. Muscle Efficiency: The efficiency of muscle function decreases as insects get larger. The relationship between muscle strength and size is not linear, and larger insects may face challenges in coordinated movement and efficient muscle function.

4. Metabolic Rate: Larger insects might struggle to meet the metabolic demands associated with increased body size. Efficient energy utilization becomes a limiting factor, affecting overall viability.

5. Predation: Larger insects may become more vulnerable to predators. Their size makes them easier targets, and the advantages of being smaller, such as agility and concealment, become essential for survival.

6. Feeding Efficiency: As insects grow larger, their feeding efficiency might decrease. The energy required to forage for food may surpass the energy gained from the food itself.

7. Developmental Constraints: The developmental processes of molting and metamorphosis, which are integral to an insect’s life cycle, impose limitations on the attainable size.

8. Environmental Conditions: In certain environments, such as those with limited oxygen concentration, larger insects might struggle to obtain sufficient oxygen, further restricting their size.

9. Evolutionary Trade-offs: Evolutionary pressures may favor smaller sizes in certain ecological niches due to trade-offs between size, reproductive strategies, and adaptation to specific environments.

Sources:

• Chapman, R. F., Simpson, S. J., & Douglas, A. E. (2013). The Insects: Structure and Function. Cambridge University Press.

Limitations of size for Animals Living in Water:

1. Buoyancy: Water provides buoyancy, supporting the weight of aquatic organisms. This allows for the existence of much larger animals in water compared to on land, where the gravitational pull is a more significant constraint.

2. Respiration: Aquatic animals often have gills, enabling efficient extraction of oxygen from water. This allows for a more effective respiratory system, potentially sustaining larger body sizes.

3. Swimming Efficiency: The streamlined shape and reduced effects of gravity in water allow for efficient movement, enabling larger sizes for aquatic animals. Whales, for example, are among the largest animals on Earth and are adapted to life in the oceans.

4. Food Availability: Water ecosystems can support larger populations of prey items, providing a more abundant food supply for predators. This abundance can contribute to the development of larger species.

5. Temperature Regulation: Water provides a more stable environment for temperature regulation. This stability can support larger animals that might face challenges related to temperature fluctuation on land.

Sources:

• Alexander, R. McN. (2006). Principles of Animal Locomotion. Princeton University Press.

• Vogel, S. (1994). Life in Moving Fluids: The Physical Biology of Flow. Princeton University Press.

The concept of an animal growing 10 times its natural size in fiction, using a lot of Handwavium!

1. Extreme Nutrient Density: An exceptionally nutrient-dense food source could potentially fuel rapid and substantial growth in an animal. This might include a novel substance with highly concentrated essential nutrients that the animal can efficiently assimilate.

2. Genetic Modification: In a fictional context, genetic modification or engineering could play a role. Introducing genes that enhance growth, metabolism, or nutrient absorption might result in animals reaching sizes beyond their natural limits.

3. Magical or Extraterrestrial Influence: In a fantastical setting, magical elements or extraterrestrial factors could be introduced. For example, exposure to a magical substance or an extraterrestrial nutrient could trigger extraordinary growth in the animal.

4. Biological Anomaly: A rare biological anomaly or mutation that dramatically increases an animal’s growth rate could be part of the fictional narrative. This could involve an unexpected interaction between the animal’s genetics and a specific type of food.

5. Artificial Growth Stimulants: In a speculative scenario, the presence of artificial growth stimulants, either intentionally or accidentally introduced into the animal’s environment, could lead to accelerated growth.

Various mythologies, religions and fictions around the world feature giant animals, often portraying them as powerful, mythical beings or creatures with extraordinary abilities. Here are some examples:

1. Jormungandr (Norse Mythology): Jormungandr, also known as the Midgard Serpent, is a giant sea serpent in Norse mythology. It is said to encircle the Earth, grasping its tail in its mouth. According to prophecy, Jormungandr will play a significant role in the events leading to Ragnarok, the end of the world.

2. Nemean Lion (Greek Mythology): In Greek mythology, the Nemean Lion was a colossal, supernatural lion with an impenetrable golden fur. It was one of the Labors of Hercules to defeat this fierce lion.

3. Kaiju (Japanese Mythology/Fiction): While not strictly part of ancient mythology, Japanese kaiju are giant monsters often featured in modern fiction and films. Examples include Godzilla, Mothra, and Rodan, representing colossal creatures with destructive powers.

4. Garuda (Hindu and Buddhist Mythology): Garuda is a mythical bird or bird-like creature in Hindu and Buddhist traditions. It is often depicted as large, with the ability to carry off elephants. Garuda is a divine companion of the god Vishnu.

5. Fenghuang (Chinese Mythology): The Fenghuang, also known as the Chinese Phoenix, is a mythical bird in Chinese mythology. It is often described as a giant and colorful bird with various supernatural abilities, symbolizing grace and longevity.

6. Yamata no Orochi (Japanese Mythology): Yamata no Orochi is an eight-headed and eight-tailed dragon or serpent in Japanese mythology. It was defeated by the storm god Susanoo, and one of its tails contained the legendary sword Kusanagi.

7. Bunyip (Australian Aboriginal Mythology): The bunyip is a mythical creature from Australian Aboriginal mythology, often described as a large, amphibious monster inhabiting waterholes, rivers, and swamps.

8. Simurgh (Persian Mythology): The Simurgh is a mythical bird-like creature in Persian mythology. It is often portrayed as a large, benevolent bird with magnificent plumage, sometimes said to possess healing powers.

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


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Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 3: Villains Show Notes



Show notes:

This has no particular format (yet), just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always feel free to comment and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy:


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Show Art by Georgia Geis

Story grid: Thriller Genre is a mash-up of Horror, Action, and Crime 

Sea of Rust: C. Robert Cargill

Terminator 2: Actor who played the scientist: Joe Morton “Dr. Miles” 

Predator[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predator\_(franchise)]

Superman I (1978); and Superman II (1980)

Short Story about wealthy people hunting poor people:

1924 short story “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell

“Surviving the Game” (1994) staring Ice-T[https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0111323/plotsummary/]

Fritz Haber-German scientist 1908 for synthesis of ammonia (Nobel prize in chemistry 1918)—dual edge sword—also know as father of chemical warfare.

Back to Future (1985): Cultural insensitivity

What is a villain?

Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines such a character as “a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime; scoundrel; or a character in a play, novel, or the like, who constitutes an important evil agency in the plot.”

The opposite of a villain is a hero. The villain’s structural purpose is to serve as the opposition of the hero character and their motives or evil actions drive a plot along. 

In contrast to the hero, who is defined by feats of ingenuity and bravery and the pursuit of justice and the greater good, a villain is often defined by their acts of selfishness, evilness, arrogance, cruelty, and cunning, displaying immoral behavior that can oppose or pervert justice

People like to love villains they relate with

Research suggests that you like villains who remind us of ourselves. 

Study published in 2020 Psychological Science, Rebecca Krause, at Northwestern University: Krause, R. J., & Rucker, D. D. (2020). Can bad be good? The attraction of a darker self. Psychological Science.

Humans hardwired to find goodness in villains

A recent study from Aarhus University found those who prefer fictional villains to heroes are more likely to be villainous themselves.

Valerie A. Umscheid, Craig E. Smith, Felix Warneken, Susan A. Gelman, Henry M. Wellman, What makes Voldemort tick? Children’s and adults’ reasoning about the nature of villains. Cognition,Volume 233, 2023

The results revealed that, overall, both children and adults believed that villains’ true selves were ‘overwhelmingly evil and much more negative than heroes’.

However, researchers also detected an asymmetry in the views, as villains were much more likely than heroes to have a true self that differed to their outer personna.

The research found that those who prefer villains such as Cruella de Vil and Darth Vader, are more likely to display the ‘dark triad‘ (Machiavellianism, narcissism and psychopathy) personality traits.

Dark Triad:

‘Narcissism describes a grandiose and entitled interpersonal style whereby one feels superior to others and craves validation (‘ego-reinforcement’),’ the researchers write.

‘Machiavellianism describes a manipulative interpersonal style characterized by duplicity, cynicism, and selfish ambition.

‘Psychopathy describes low self-control and a callous interpersonal style aimed at immediate gratification.


Thanks for spending time with us. You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. Until next time…


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Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 2: AI Show Notes



Episode 2: The Show Notes

This has no particular format, just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always feel free to comment and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy:

What we drinking:

Joe: Riot: Revolution Brewery

Nick: Foeder Fiend Three Floyd’s


Let us know:

What do you think about AI?

Any questions we didn’t cover?

What did we get wrong (Check the show notes)?


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Show notes:

Algorithms bias in medical

Chat bot on social media

AI Fashion model week

Anti-AI clothing

Artist using Anti-AI digital image protection:

UChicago scientists develop new tool protect artists

New tools help artists fight AI by directly disrupting the systems

Protection against facial recognition in digital photos 

AI math 

Affective Computing

Self driving cars and google search misidentify POC because of training data

Self driving car racial bias

Google racist gorillas photo recognition algorithm



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What’s up Jotham? Is it too late to say Happy New Year?

It’s January 2022, and even though we are 8 days into the New Year, and a little late to the party, I’m going to wish you all a Very Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year!

I always wonder how late is too late to wish someone a Happy New Year. I mean what if the first time you see someone is in March, is it okay to say, “Happy New Year.” Okay, March may be pushing it, but when do you stop saying, “Happy New Year?” The same day the Holiday decorations come down; after the Chinese New Year? Or are you wishing Uncle Charlie a Happy New Year and Independence Day with some potato salad? LOL

Okay, I’m being a little silly!

At the end of the year Georgia (atomicnumber14) and I found out that Rabbit Hole of Research would have a table at the eighth NWI Comic Con on February 12th 2022! This was exciting and terrifying news and we realized we had a bit of work to get done. But I am happy to report we have put together some Zines a coloring book and some other fun stuff to debut at the Con. Here is a sneak peek of one of the Zines:

This has been a fun collaborative project. Mark your calendar: more details coming soon about the Comic Con!

Oh, ignore that microphone in the picture, that would have nothing to do with that podcast thing I’ve been talking about. That’s not the handwavium you are looking for!

The other thing that has been filling my time is working on the Developmental Edits of my new Novel. I did meet my goal to have the first round of cuts and structural rewrites finished early January. Doing the numbers I cut around 7,000 words, and added back around 17,000, for a net gain of 10K words.

Now I am reading the novel to make sure no plot holes opened up during all this restructuring, and filling them in. I am very excited about this novel and looking forward to the day it get’s into your hands, but the road to publishing is a long a arduous one. But while you wait don’t forget about my two stories out right now:

My paranormal romance werewolf shifter novella, ‘Eve’ will be gone soon! So, Order it Now: Kindle Unlimited, ebook and paperback! If you picked up a copy, thank you!


Also, my Sci-Fi Psychological Thriller Novel turns 1-years old next month, ‘Will You Still Love Me If I Become Someone Else?’ Order online Now: e-book and paperback!



Maybe a limited edition Hardback copy giveaway to celebrate will be in order! If you cannot wait for the giveaway, I have some copies for sale on my web shop

One last thing would be the Standing Desk I mentioned last month. I ordered some electric legs off Amazon and I will be attaching the top I am finishing this weekend to it. I will post the finished pictures, but here are the legs. (Ignore the unfinished basement floor.)

Okay, That’s all of the major news. Keep reading below to check out the new feature, and check out some of the creatives that are keeping me entertained.

And Finally, after a long break, I will be back later this month with a brand new Rabbit Hole of Research Episode! Check out the old ones to get your snarky Handwavium-Science Fix!

You can always email or follow me online for real time tracking and to see what craft beers I’m drinking (find me on Untappd @jomega22).

Happy December! And that means it’s almost 2022!

Happy Holidays!

It’s December and I am unsure where the year has gone.The last couple months have seemed to drag along, but it’s time for holiday cheer, egg nog, cookies, lights and all that jazz!

As the year winds down, I got the first round of Developmental Edits from my agent (Developmental edits are 30,000 foot big picture edits of the manuscript, plot, pacing, character arcs, etc.). I know a lot of folks don’t like the editing process, but I actually enjoy it. What do you like more, editing or writing? I’m curious, email me and let me know!

When people ask why do you need to work with critique partners, writing groups or developmental editors, I always say, “they are the eyes in the author’s blind spots.”

That’s right. No matter how much love I’ve put into crafting a twisty plot that will keep you turning the page, the tone, pacing, emotional growth of my characters always improve going through these important developmental edits.

Always remember not to take the comments personally. I know it is hard to send your baby out into the world and someone tells you your favorite scene drags on, before you go into crazy mode, remember these are just suggestions, one person’s thoughts, but this is someone whose judgment you respected enough to send you baby to in the first place.

So, when I get back comments, I read them, I mumble and curse to myself under my breath about how idiotic the negative comments are (the positive comments are always spot on) then I put the comments away (I may read the positive comments again, but then put it away) for a couple days or so, and busy myself with something else. After the excitement of finally moving forward with the manuscript fades a bit, I approach each comment in a serious and thoughtful way.

Even if you disagree with a comment or potential change, you should revisit that scene or the character’s emotional arc, tone, sensitivity, colorism, physical abuse, sex, abrasive language, etc.

If you are still hesitant to go in and take the scalpel or sledgehammer to your baby, copy the section(s) or chapter(s) in question into a new document (save it as MS_awesome_as_is), turn on track changes (they should already be on) and then experiment with changing the scene or section within your manuscript, and see what you think (ask yourself honestly, do things read better? The same? Or the original was the bee’s knees!)

I’ll be the first to admit that cutting and rewriting big chunks of your perfect baby is hard. My WYS_awesome_as_is file for Will You Still Love Me… was about 20,000 words over a couple rounds of Developmental edits (I cut an entire chapter), but in the end the pacing of several chapters improved, characters and plot lines I introduced but never fully fleshed out were removed and all this created space to more fully explore the world and growth of the main characters of the novel, Alex, Marci and Leslie.

And, bonus that chapter and other stuff you cut may be useful as a scene in the sequel (Did I mention I finished the first draft of Will You Still Love Me If I Become Someone Else part 2!)

Okay, I’m going to get off my, “editing is great,” soapbox, but I’ll share more of my process as I go along, like how I edit scenes in my stories using Comic book Panel formatting. But, more on that later.

Speaking of Comics, I just found out earlier this week that Rabbit Hole of Research (atomicnumber14 (Georgia) and I) will have a table at the NWI-Comic Con in February 12th 2022!!!

Mark your calendar: more details coming soon!

If you missed it:

My paranormal romance werewolf shifter novella, ‘Eve’was released October 31st in the Moonlight Anthology! You can Order it Now: Kindle Unlimited, ebook and paperback!


Also, check out my debut Sci-Fi Psychological Thriller Novel, ‘Will You Still Love Me If I Become Someone Else?’ Order online Now: e-book and paperback!

Buy a book from my web-store (paperback or hardback)anytime before December 24th 2021, and get a free atomicnumber14.com original relief print that has been featured on Rabbit Hole of Research!!!


Okay, Enjoy the rest of the day! you can always email or follow me online for real time tracking and to see what craft beers I’m drinking (find me on Untappd @jomega22).

November 13th: How to Balance Handwavium and the Actual Factual in your story

I often get asked how does a research scientist balance using Handwavium to write Speculative Science fiction or Paranormal stories and staying Actual Factual?

So, little secret, I don’t try to keep any balance. I do a bit of research (sometimes I get lost in the Rabbit Hole of Research) about things that I may use in a story trying to learn more about the history/origin of paranormal legends and think about how these phenomena can be explained using science fact, or research how a technology may work and the limits that exist today and push past these limits in a “speculative” way to create interesting plot twists in a story.

Yet, after I do research, I often put it away, and focus on writing the first draft (just get those words down), and not let the Actual Factual box my story in.

It is in latter drafts where I square the Actual Factual using as little of Handwavium as possible to plug those pesky plot holes (which I like to explore in the Rabbit Hole of Research).

Speaking of werewolves (I did an episode on the science of werewolves; check it out here) and balanced the Paranormal with Actual Factual in writing my paranormal romance shifter novella, ‘Eve’:

My paranormal romance werewolf shifter novella, ‘Eve’was released October 31st in the Moonlight Anthology! You can Order it Now: ebook and paperback!


Also, check out my debut Sci-Fi Psychological Thriller Novel, ‘Will You Still Love Me If I Become Someone Else?’ Order Now, e-book and paperback!

Will You Still Love Me If I Become Someone Else?

It’s October 16th, What’s up Jotham?

Hey y’all, I hope this email finds you safe and well. No matter how you found my newsletter, thank you for joining.

I know what you are thinking, “Jotham, what is this Rabbit Hole of Research?” Well, my newsletter comes out twice a month (this is the goal), one edition will feature an author interview, book promos/samplers and giveaways; The second edition will explore the quirky science in fiction. Also, I say Handwavium a lot. Handwavium is a fictional material used to smooth plot holes.

So, a couple quick updates and no Handwavium.

A lot has happened since the last Rabbit Hole of Research newsletter—I am now represented by the literary agent Kat Kerr at the Donald Maass Literary Agency!

I am excited to work with Kat!


Other thing that has gained some attention in the last couple week is my mustache! I’ve been trying different waxes to tame the might-stache—you can follow the adventures of the stache and craft beers I’m drinking on Instagram. Been trying some different waxes to tame, shape, the stache.


The other thing you may have noticed if you follow me on SocialMedia AtomicNumber14 (Georgia) and I have officially combined our talents for your enjoyment on Rabbit Hole of Research newesletters. We will be putting together some Zines in the near future combining my words and Georgia’s prints.Georgia’s prints are on display at Studio 659 art gallery in Whiting, IN.

Last weekend, Georgia and I along with two friends finally got to see RENT. During the lockdown there was a NPR story about the 25th anniversary tour and the life and legacy of Jonathan Larson (Check it out here).
I was driving down the relatively empty streets of Chicago and my eyes teared up listening to this—Once parked I immediately texted my good fried who is a huge RENT fan and asked if she wanted to go (she has seen RENT with her wife 10+ times). She said yes! LOL
This was the first live performance we all had been to since early 2020. Masked, vaccinated and it was nice to be out and see this fabulous performance. Also, I discovered that I really enjoy musicals—



And finally, my paranormal romance shifter novella, ‘Eve’ was delivered to the publisher and will be released October 31st in the Moonlight Anthology! You can Preorder it now!

Also, the publisher just let us know that a limited number of paperback copies will be available—stay tuned for more on that.

Click Here to PreOrder Now



Okay, That’s all the major updates and news. And you can always email or follow me online for real time tracking). So, no author interview this month, but did find some awesome authors to share and book fairs!