The Show Notes: Rabbit Hole of Research Episode 10: Time Travel is Weird

Nick and I talk about the Event Horizon, Groundhog Day, Evil Dead, Somewhere in Time, Final Destination, Handwavium, Encyclopedia Britannica, Handwashing, Video Game logic and more spacetime stuff.

Print By Georgia Geis @ atomic_number14

Episode 10: Time Travel is Weird

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy. 

Don’t forget to Rate the show!

artwork by 

Georgia Geis@atomicnumber14 https://www.instagram.com/atomic_number14/

Say hello and let us know:

If you traveled through time what Three Books would you take?

Favorite Time Travel Machine?

Is driving a car considered time travel?


What we drinking?

Nick and Joe shared a celebratory Leche Borracho: Bottle Logic Brewing


Images from the Fan Event held at Bean Me Up Roastery. And if you missed it, don’t worry we will do one again for our 1 year podcast anniversary!


Joe’s Show Notes:

Time travelrefers to the hypothetical concept of moving between different points in time, either forwards or backwards.

What is a black hole? a region of spacetime where gravity is so strong that nothing, including light and other electromagnetic waves, is capable of possessing enough energy to escape it.

What is a wormhole? a hypothetical structure connecting disparate points in spacetime, and is based on a special solution of the Einstein field equations

In Einstein’s theory of general relativity, making a wormhole is pretty straightforward: You just build a black hole and connect it to a hypothetical white hole (which is the exact opposite of a black hole), and boom, there you have it: a tunnel through space-time.

What is a white hole? a hypothetical region of spacetime and singularity that cannot be entered from the outside, although energy-matter, light and information can escape from it.

What is spacetime? a mathematical model that fuses the three dimensions of space and the one dimension of time into a single four-dimensional continuum

The Year Ash ended up in Evil Dead 3 is 1300 AD: Army Of Darkness

Evil Dead Timeline.

Time Bandits (1981)

We realized after recording it wasn’t Miracle on 34th street but It’s a Wonderful Life (the Christmas movie I was thinking about.)

HG Wells Time Machine movies; 1960 and 2002

Is Final Destination a Time Travel Movie?

The Encyclopedia Britannica 15th edition with 32 volumes was last printed in 2010.

The Cotton Club

Kitty Pride Time travel by phasing.

The Flash time travel and the Multiverse.

Let The Ants Try. 1949 by Frederik Pohl (as James MacCreigh)

Young Marvels by Skottie Young, Dan Slott, Ruben Diaz

Earth has a rotational kinetic energy of 2.14×10^29 J. So You’d need a minimum of twice that much energy to stop and then start Earth rotating in the opposite direction.

Somewhere in Time (1980)

Superman: The Movie (1978)

Christopher Reeve

History of time travel Movie (2014)

See You Yesterday (2019)Produced by Spike Lee

Horology: the study of time and the art of measuring it. It involves the design, construction, and maintenance of clocks, watches, and other timepieces.

Chronometrythe science of accurate time measurement


MYTHICAL REFERENCES TO TIME TRAVEL

  1. Hindu mythology, the Vishnu Purana mentions the story of King Raivata Kakudmi, who travels to heaven to meet the creator Brahma and is surprised to learn when he returns to Earth that many ages have passed.
  2. The Buddhist Pāli Canon mentions the relativity of time. The Payasi Sutta tells of one of the Buddha’s chief disciples, Kumara Kassapa, who explains to the skeptic Payasi that time in the Heavens passes differently than on Earth.
  3. The Japanese tale of “Urashima Tarō“, first described in the Manyoshu tells of a young fisherman named Urashima-no who visits an undersea palace. After three days, he returns home to his village and finds himself 300 years in the future, where he has been forgotten, his house is in ruins, and his family has died.
  4. In Jewish tradition, the 1st-century BC scholar Honi ha-M’agel is said to have fallen asleep and slept for seventy years. When waking up he returned home but found none of the people he knew, and no one believed his claims of who he was.

Early examples of Prolonged Sleep Time Travel

  1. The Year 2440: A Dream If Ever There Was One, (1770) by Louis-Sébastien Mercier.
  2. Rip Van Winkle (1819) by Washington Irving
  3. Looking Backward (1888) by Edward Bellamy
  4. When the Sleeper Awakes (1899) by H. G. Wells

Early examples of Backward Time Travel

  1. Chinese novel Supplement to the Journey to the West (c. 1640) by Dong Yue features magical mirrors and jade gateways that connect various points in time
  2. Samuel Madden’s Memoirs of the Twentieth Century (1733) is a series of letters from British ambassadors in 1997 and 1998 to diplomats in the past, conveying the political and religious conditions of the future.
  3. Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol (1843) has early depictions of mystical time travel in both directions.

Early examples of Machine Based Time Travel

  1. The Clock that Went Backward by Edward Page Mitchell,which appeared in the New York Sun in (1881).
  2. Enrique Gaspar y Rimbau’s El Anacronópete (1887) may have been the first story to feature a vessel engineered to travel through time.
  3. H. G. Wells’ The Time Machine (1895) popularized the concept of time travel by mechanical means.

Time Travel Paradoxes

1. Grandfather Paradox: As mentioned earlier, the grandfather paradox involves a time traveler going back in time and preventing their own grandfather from meeting their grandmother, thereby preventing their own birth. This creates a logical contradiction because if the time traveler prevents their own birth, they would not exist to travel back in time in the first place.

2. Bootstrap Paradox: In a bootstrap paradox, an object or information is sent back in time, creating a loop where the object’s origin cannot be determined. For example, a person might travel back in time and give their past self a book containing information about the future. The question then arises: where did the book come from if it was never created?

3. Predestination Paradox: Also known as a causal loop, the predestination paradox occurs when a time traveler’s actions in the past inadvertently contribute to the events they were trying to prevent. This paradox suggests that events are predestined to happen in a certain way, regardless of attempts to change them.

4. Ontological Paradox: Similar to the bootstrap paradox, an ontological paradox involves objects or information that exist without having a discernible origin. For example, a person might receive instructions or blueprints from their future self, allowing them to create a new invention. However, the question remains: who originally created the instructions if they were never created by anyone?

5. Twin Paradox: In the context of special relativity, the twin paradox arises when one twin travels through space at relativistic speeds while the other remains on Earth. When the traveling twin returns, they find that less time has passed for them than for their sibling. This paradox challenges our intuitive understanding of time dilation and the effects of relative motion.


The idea of reversing the rotation of the Earth to travel back in time—pure Handwavium

1. Conservation of Energy and Momentum: Reversing the rotation of the Earth would require an enormous amount of energy and would violate the principles of conservation of energy and momentum. Even if it were somehow possible to reverse the rotation of the Earth, it would not cause time to flow backward.

2. Time and Spacetime: In physics, time is considered a dimension of spacetime, and reversing the rotation of the Earth would not alter the direction of time. Time is a fundamental aspect of the universe that flows inexorably forward, regardless of the rotation or movement of celestial bodies.

3. Causality and Paradoxes: Even if it were possible to reverse the rotation of the Earth and somehow manipulate time, it would likely lead to paradoxes and inconsistencies in causality. The implications of reversing time would raise significant philosophical and theoretical questions about the nature of reality.


Print by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. 

The Show Notes: Rabbit Hole of Research Episode 9: Sleep Studies and Dreams

Joe, Nick and Georgia talk sleep, Chianti & fava beans, brain rinsing, They Live, Inception, lucid dreaming, noisy ice, John Wick’s dreams, Nick’s research, Jacob’s ladder, sleep paralysis, and more.

Episode 9 – Sleep Studies

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy. 

Don’t forget to Rate the show!

artwork by 

Georgia Geis@atomicnumber14 https://www.instagram.com/atomic_number14/

*Both Joe and Georgia have notes below


Say hello and let us know:

Do you take naps?

Can you lucid dream?

Do you have a favorite Sleep or Dream inspired movie or novel?


What we drinking?

Joe- insufficient clearance — Sketchbook brewery

Nick- Matcha Martian —Bean Me Up Roastery

Georgia — Watermelon White Claw


Joe’s Show Notes:

oneirology

(own-I-rology) the scientific study of dreams.


Polysomnography

known as a sleep study, is a test used to diagnose sleep disorders.


Famous Sleep Studies

  1. The Sleepless Elite (2014)
  2. The “Fatal Familial Insomnia” Case Studies (1980s)
  3. The Randy Gardner Experiment (1960s): stayed awake for 264.4 hours (11 days and 24 minutes) as part of a science fair project
  4. The “Sleepless in San Diego” Study (2002)

Sleep paralysis


Sleep deprivation


Sleepwalking killer Scott Falater


Sleepwalker’ Acquitted of Murdering Mother-in-Law After 15-Mile Drive


Lucid Dreaming


Sleep is crucial


Mantis from the MCU


Hormones Makes us Sleepy

Circadian rhythms


Do Other Animals Dream


does lunar phases effect sleep?


Pain receptors in brain?


Staying active during brain surgery, playing instruments


They Live (1988)


“The computer says no”—Little Britain show


Sundowners syndrome


Marvel’s Sleepwalker Character

Marvel’s Nightmare Character


If you die in dream do you die in real life


Georgia’s Tid Bits

Washing Brain During Sleep 

Nightmare On Elm Street: True Story

Jacob’s Ladder:Dreams and Consciousness,Hollywood-Style by Kelly Bulkley

Jacob’s Ladder- Movie

MIT in Fluid Interfaces

New device can control your dreams: Marketers try to hack the brain!

Taking the perfect nap by NPR


Print by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. 

Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 4: Giant Animals Show Notes



Episode 4: The Show Notes

This has no particular format; it’s just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always, feel free to comment, and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy.

What we drinking:

Joe: Phony Negroni —St. Argrestis

Nick: Water


Let us know:

What’s your favorite animal?

What’s your favorite giant animal movie?

Favorite color?


Leave a comment

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Show notes:

Technically any plane carrying the president is designated as Air Force One:

Air Force One (1997) movie

What is Dry January

Food of the Gods 1976 movie 

Food of the Gods Novel by H.G. Wells

Art by Georgia Geis @atomic_number14

Let the Ants Try by Frederik Pohl (short story)

Where do sloths live?

Sloths are found throughout Central America and northern South America, including parts of Brazil and Peru

Who sings song—“You and me, baby, ain’t nothin’ but mammals So let’s do it like they do on the Discovery Channel”? 

Bloodhound Group—‘The Bad Touch’ 

Aldi and Trader Joe’s history

E. L. Doctorow: Homer and Langley—universal newspaper

Seanan McGuire (Mira Grant) Into the Drowning Deep

Pushing beached whales into ocean?

Whalefall—Daniel Kraus 

Largest land animal

The African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) holds the title for the largest land animal. Adult male African elephants can weigh between 5,000 to 14,000 pounds (2,268 to 6,350 kilograms) and stand about 8.2 to 13 feet (2.5 to 4 meters) tall at the shoulder. Female African elephants are generally smaller than males but still large compared to other land animals.

It’s worth noting that the size of elephants can vary, and these measurements are approximate. The African Elephant’s large size is a testament to its adaptation to diverse habitats across the African continent.

Largest sea animal

The blue whale (Balaenoptera musculus) holds the title for the largest sea animal and, in fact, the largest animal on Earth. Adult blue whales can reach lengths of up to 100 feet (30 meters) and weigh as much as 200 tons. These enormous marine mammals are filter feeders, primarily consuming small shrimp-like animals called krill.

The sheer size of blue whales is remarkable, and they are found in oceans around the world, making them a truly global species. Despite their massive size, blue whales are gentle creatures, and their conservation status is classified as endangered due to historical whaling practices. Conservation efforts are ongoing to protect and preserve these magnificent marine animals.

The size of animals is constrained by various biological, ecological, and physical factors. Some limitations include:

1. Metabolic Demands: Larger animals generally have higher metabolic demands. Meeting these demands becomes challenging, as it requires sufficient food intake, efficient energy utilization, and effective waste removal.

2. Support Structures: The strength of bones, muscles, and other support structures is crucial. Beyond a certain size, the ability to support the body’s weight becomes a limiting factor.

3. Respiratory System: Diffusion-based respiratory systems become less effective as an organism grows larger. Efficient gas exchange becomes challenging, potentially limiting the maximum size of animals relying on this mechanism.

4. Heat Dissipation: Larger animals face challenges in dissipating heat efficiently. This is due to the decrease in surface area relative to volume, affecting heat exchange with the environment.

5. Reproductive Challenges: Larger animals often have fewer offspring and longer gestation periods. This could impact reproductive strategies and population dynamics.

6. Predator-Prey Dynamics: Size affects the ability to evade predators or capture prey. Both extreme sizes, very large or very small, can be disadvantageous in certain ecological niches.

7. Evolutionary Pressures: Evolutionary pressures may favor smaller sizes in specific environments, promoting agility, rapid reproduction, and adaptability over large size.

8. Ecological Niche: Each species occupies a specific ecological niche, and the size of an organism is often adapted to its role in the ecosystem. Deviating too much from the optimal size for a given niche could be disadvantageous.

Sources:

• Schmidt-Nielsen, K. (1984). Scaling: Why is Animal Size So Important? Cambridge University Press.

The size of insects is constrained by various biological and physical factors. Here are some key limitations:

1. Exoskeleton: Insects have an exoskeleton made of a rigid material called chitin. As they grow, they need to molt and shed their exoskeleton to accommodate a larger size. This process becomes more challenging as the insect gets larger due to the increased structural demands.

2. Respiratory System: Insects rely on a system of tiny tubes called tracheae for respiration. As they grow larger, the surface area available for gas exchange becomes insufficient, limiting their ability to provide oxygen to all cells effectively.

3. Muscle Efficiency: The efficiency of muscle function decreases as insects get larger. The relationship between muscle strength and size is not linear, and larger insects may face challenges in coordinated movement and efficient muscle function.

4. Metabolic Rate: Larger insects might struggle to meet the metabolic demands associated with increased body size. Efficient energy utilization becomes a limiting factor, affecting overall viability.

5. Predation: Larger insects may become more vulnerable to predators. Their size makes them easier targets, and the advantages of being smaller, such as agility and concealment, become essential for survival.

6. Feeding Efficiency: As insects grow larger, their feeding efficiency might decrease. The energy required to forage for food may surpass the energy gained from the food itself.

7. Developmental Constraints: The developmental processes of molting and metamorphosis, which are integral to an insect’s life cycle, impose limitations on the attainable size.

8. Environmental Conditions: In certain environments, such as those with limited oxygen concentration, larger insects might struggle to obtain sufficient oxygen, further restricting their size.

9. Evolutionary Trade-offs: Evolutionary pressures may favor smaller sizes in certain ecological niches due to trade-offs between size, reproductive strategies, and adaptation to specific environments.

Sources:

• Chapman, R. F., Simpson, S. J., & Douglas, A. E. (2013). The Insects: Structure and Function. Cambridge University Press.

Limitations of size for Animals Living in Water:

1. Buoyancy: Water provides buoyancy, supporting the weight of aquatic organisms. This allows for the existence of much larger animals in water compared to on land, where the gravitational pull is a more significant constraint.

2. Respiration: Aquatic animals often have gills, enabling efficient extraction of oxygen from water. This allows for a more effective respiratory system, potentially sustaining larger body sizes.

3. Swimming Efficiency: The streamlined shape and reduced effects of gravity in water allow for efficient movement, enabling larger sizes for aquatic animals. Whales, for example, are among the largest animals on Earth and are adapted to life in the oceans.

4. Food Availability: Water ecosystems can support larger populations of prey items, providing a more abundant food supply for predators. This abundance can contribute to the development of larger species.

5. Temperature Regulation: Water provides a more stable environment for temperature regulation. This stability can support larger animals that might face challenges related to temperature fluctuation on land.

Sources:

• Alexander, R. McN. (2006). Principles of Animal Locomotion. Princeton University Press.

• Vogel, S. (1994). Life in Moving Fluids: The Physical Biology of Flow. Princeton University Press.

The concept of an animal growing 10 times its natural size in fiction, using a lot of Handwavium!

1. Extreme Nutrient Density: An exceptionally nutrient-dense food source could potentially fuel rapid and substantial growth in an animal. This might include a novel substance with highly concentrated essential nutrients that the animal can efficiently assimilate.

2. Genetic Modification: In a fictional context, genetic modification or engineering could play a role. Introducing genes that enhance growth, metabolism, or nutrient absorption might result in animals reaching sizes beyond their natural limits.

3. Magical or Extraterrestrial Influence: In a fantastical setting, magical elements or extraterrestrial factors could be introduced. For example, exposure to a magical substance or an extraterrestrial nutrient could trigger extraordinary growth in the animal.

4. Biological Anomaly: A rare biological anomaly or mutation that dramatically increases an animal’s growth rate could be part of the fictional narrative. This could involve an unexpected interaction between the animal’s genetics and a specific type of food.

5. Artificial Growth Stimulants: In a speculative scenario, the presence of artificial growth stimulants, either intentionally or accidentally introduced into the animal’s environment, could lead to accelerated growth.

Various mythologies, religions and fictions around the world feature giant animals, often portraying them as powerful, mythical beings or creatures with extraordinary abilities. Here are some examples:

1. Jormungandr (Norse Mythology): Jormungandr, also known as the Midgard Serpent, is a giant sea serpent in Norse mythology. It is said to encircle the Earth, grasping its tail in its mouth. According to prophecy, Jormungandr will play a significant role in the events leading to Ragnarok, the end of the world.

2. Nemean Lion (Greek Mythology): In Greek mythology, the Nemean Lion was a colossal, supernatural lion with an impenetrable golden fur. It was one of the Labors of Hercules to defeat this fierce lion.

3. Kaiju (Japanese Mythology/Fiction): While not strictly part of ancient mythology, Japanese kaiju are giant monsters often featured in modern fiction and films. Examples include Godzilla, Mothra, and Rodan, representing colossal creatures with destructive powers.

4. Garuda (Hindu and Buddhist Mythology): Garuda is a mythical bird or bird-like creature in Hindu and Buddhist traditions. It is often depicted as large, with the ability to carry off elephants. Garuda is a divine companion of the god Vishnu.

5. Fenghuang (Chinese Mythology): The Fenghuang, also known as the Chinese Phoenix, is a mythical bird in Chinese mythology. It is often described as a giant and colorful bird with various supernatural abilities, symbolizing grace and longevity.

6. Yamata no Orochi (Japanese Mythology): Yamata no Orochi is an eight-headed and eight-tailed dragon or serpent in Japanese mythology. It was defeated by the storm god Susanoo, and one of its tails contained the legendary sword Kusanagi.

7. Bunyip (Australian Aboriginal Mythology): The bunyip is a mythical creature from Australian Aboriginal mythology, often described as a large, amphibious monster inhabiting waterholes, rivers, and swamps.

8. Simurgh (Persian Mythology): The Simurgh is a mythical bird-like creature in Persian mythology. It is often portrayed as a large, benevolent bird with magnificent plumage, sometimes said to possess healing powers.

Okay, that’s it for this episode. How’d we do?


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking.


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Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 3: Villains Show Notes



Show notes:

This has no particular format (yet), just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always feel free to comment and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy:


Leave a comment

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Show Art by Georgia Geis

Story grid: Thriller Genre is a mash-up of Horror, Action, and Crime 

Sea of Rust: C. Robert Cargill

Terminator 2: Actor who played the scientist: Joe Morton “Dr. Miles” 

Predator[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Predator\_(franchise)]

Superman I (1978); and Superman II (1980)

Short Story about wealthy people hunting poor people:

1924 short story “The Most Dangerous Game” by Richard Connell

“Surviving the Game” (1994) staring Ice-T[https://m.imdb.com/title/tt0111323/plotsummary/]

Fritz Haber-German scientist 1908 for synthesis of ammonia (Nobel prize in chemistry 1918)—dual edge sword—also know as father of chemical warfare.

Back to Future (1985): Cultural insensitivity

What is a villain?

Random House Unabridged Dictionary defines such a character as “a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime; scoundrel; or a character in a play, novel, or the like, who constitutes an important evil agency in the plot.”

The opposite of a villain is a hero. The villain’s structural purpose is to serve as the opposition of the hero character and their motives or evil actions drive a plot along. 

In contrast to the hero, who is defined by feats of ingenuity and bravery and the pursuit of justice and the greater good, a villain is often defined by their acts of selfishness, evilness, arrogance, cruelty, and cunning, displaying immoral behavior that can oppose or pervert justice

People like to love villains they relate with

Research suggests that you like villains who remind us of ourselves. 

Study published in 2020 Psychological Science, Rebecca Krause, at Northwestern University: Krause, R. J., & Rucker, D. D. (2020). Can bad be good? The attraction of a darker self. Psychological Science.

Humans hardwired to find goodness in villains

A recent study from Aarhus University found those who prefer fictional villains to heroes are more likely to be villainous themselves.

Valerie A. Umscheid, Craig E. Smith, Felix Warneken, Susan A. Gelman, Henry M. Wellman, What makes Voldemort tick? Children’s and adults’ reasoning about the nature of villains. Cognition,Volume 233, 2023

The results revealed that, overall, both children and adults believed that villains’ true selves were ‘overwhelmingly evil and much more negative than heroes’.

However, researchers also detected an asymmetry in the views, as villains were much more likely than heroes to have a true self that differed to their outer personna.

The research found that those who prefer villains such as Cruella de Vil and Darth Vader, are more likely to display the ‘dark triad‘ (Machiavellianism, narcissism and psychopathy) personality traits.

Dark Triad:

‘Narcissism describes a grandiose and entitled interpersonal style whereby one feels superior to others and craves validation (‘ego-reinforcement’),’ the researchers write.

‘Machiavellianism describes a manipulative interpersonal style characterized by duplicity, cynicism, and selfish ambition.

‘Psychopathy describes low self-control and a callous interpersonal style aimed at immediate gratification.


Thanks for spending time with us. You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking. Until next time…


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Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast Episode 2: AI Show Notes



Episode 2: The Show Notes

This has no particular format, just correcting or updating anything in the show we didn’t get a chance to fully talk about or things we had on the tips of our tongues and couldn’t get out as we recorded. As always feel free to comment and we will address stuff in future shows! Enjoy:

What we drinking:

Joe: Riot: Revolution Brewery

Nick: Foeder Fiend Three Floyd’s


Let us know:

What do you think about AI?

Any questions we didn’t cover?

What did we get wrong (Check the show notes)?


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Show notes:

Algorithms bias in medical

Chat bot on social media

AI Fashion model week

Anti-AI clothing

Artist using Anti-AI digital image protection:

UChicago scientists develop new tool protect artists

New tools help artists fight AI by directly disrupting the systems

Protection against facial recognition in digital photos 

AI math 

Affective Computing

Self driving cars and google search misidentify POC because of training data

Self driving car racial bias

Google racist gorillas photo recognition algorithm



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What’s Up Jotham?


What? Jotham has a Podcast!

Welcome! The Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast is available now! So excited to share science and pop culture with you. You can listen to the Podcast on most providers (Apple, Spotify, YouTube, Amazon, etc), the Substack app, in a browser on my website or from this email!

SubstackAppleSpotifyYouTubeAmazon, Joe’s Website

Who Are We?

We are Jotham (Joe), a research mad scientist and author; Nick, roaster of the coffee bean, entrepreneur and pop culture guru; and sometimes Georgia, librarian, storyteller, and print maker. 

So, What is this Rabbit Hole of Research Podcast? 

It’s like playing a game of Telephone, where we will start in one place and let the conversation lead us down the winding scenic road exploring the science in science fiction, separating the facts from the Handwavium. We’ll have a little fun and you’ll learn a few facts you can use to impress your friends at a party or use as a conversation starter to go down your own rabbit holes. 

It will not just be us rambling, fumbling and tumbling down the rabbit hole, but we will invite creators, thinkers and innovators on to talk about their research, creative process and join the lively conversation exploring the quirky science in fiction. 

We know you have many choices of entertainment, so we will keep the episodes short, about the time it takes to drink a tasty beverage. So, please join us on this journey down the rabbit hole.

When Can I Expect The First Episodes?

NOW!

Episode 1 (Gaba Girl and Reanimation) and Episode 2 (We Talking about AI) will drop together. We should publish an episode every two weeks or so at first, but as we get into a routine we will get to weekly.

When Will The First Guests be on? And Can I Be a Guest?

So, the first guest will make an appearance in Episode 3. And sure if you want to be a guest, just drop me an email!

What About the Newsletter?

Even though I’ve been on a little Rabbit Hole of Research Newsletter vacation, don’t worry the newsletter will return this month (Feb 10th) with writing updates (like what now that my publisher closed), when will my new book go on submission to publishers, and what I’m reading, listening, watching, etc.

As always, thanks for the support! I couldn’t do this without you!

Cheers!


You can always email (I do answer back), click the comment link below, or follow me online for real time tracking.

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